5 Outdoor or Stunt Ads

Outdoor ads have a long tradition in marketing. There are entire sites dedicated to unearthing vintage ads and collectors who buy up old signage. Most of us recognize billboards and outdoor signage as a part of our memories and current everyday lives. I have found some very creative outdoor ads for you, some that may cross over into a slightly different genre and be considered more of an advertising “stunt.” I hope you enjoy and learn from these great examples:

“Carbon Cloud”

carbon cloud

Link to Ad: http://www.adsoftheworld.com/collection/climate_change_awareness#showdelta=23

  • Firm: Ogilvy, Beijing, China
  • Company: World Wildlife Federation (WWF)
  • Title: Black Cloud
  • Event Date: January 2007

Objective: Show people how much carbon is released into the air for only one day of driving. Additionally, the WWF received a lot of press/news coverage in China and gained many new volunteers because of the balloon stunt.

Target Market: Young commuters (Millennials and Gen X) who understand their environmental impact but need concrete tips and facts on how to change their behaviors.

Action: Convince drivers to refrain from driving one day per week to reduce carbon emissions.

Value Proposition: By reducing the number of days you drive, you will reduce the amount of pollution in the air. Drive less, breath better.

 

“Exam in Progress: Please Talk”

Exams

Link to Ad: https://www.adsoftheworld.com/media/ambient/papyrus_dont_be_silent

  • Firm: TBWA\Manchester, UK
  • Company: Papyrus
  • Title: Don’t be Silent
  • Publish/Event Date: April 2017

Objective: Papyrus, a mostly paper and stationery company, decided to use their name to help bring attention to stress and anxiety among students.

Target Market: Students who bottle up their stress and anxiety during exam/finals time each year.

Action: Papyrus urges students to talk about their stress rather than remaining silent. They posted these flyers around schools with information at the bottom of each on how to seek help.

Value Proposition: Companies who extend goodwill and help are remembered as “good” companies. For a student who isn’t stressed, it’s a sweet gesture. To a student who uses the referenced resources, Papyrus will forever be a name they trust.

 

“Prius Launch”

Prius

Link to Ad: https://www.effie.org/case_database/case/NA_2011_5329

  • Firm: Saatchi & Saatchi LA
  • Company: Toyota Motor Sales USA, Inc.
  • Title: Harmony Installations
  • Publish/Event Date: 2011
  • Awards: Effie-2011 BRONZE MEDIA INNOVATION

Objective: Relaunch the Prius brand as a “mainstream” environmental alternative in a down market.

Target Market: Expand their demographic to be wider than just the “environmental crowd.” Market to all car consumers by proving a commitment to their local businesses and communities.

Action: Allow consumers to interact with the lovely displays and widen their demographic through the interactive traveling show that looked more like art and less like a car ad.

Value Proposition: To the consumer, this approach said, “Prius isn’t just a car brand, it’s a commitment to a lifestyle and Prius is committed to that lifestyle beyond just the car.”

 

“This is not a billboard.”

Royal Cruise

Link to Ad: https://www.effie.org/case_database/case/ME_2017_E-1617-529

  • Firm: MullenLowe Mediahub U.S. *Lead Agency
  • Company: Royal Caribbean International
  • Title: #ComeSeekLive
  • Publish/Event Date: 2017
  • Awards: Effie- 2017 Silver

Objective: Combine digital outdoor advertising boards with a new technology, Periscope, that allows specific preselected passengers of the Royal Caribbean to show live adventures aboard the cruise ship.

Target Market: Adults in New York City who were considering a vacation and who had never considered a cruise as an option. Reportedly, due to these ads, Royal Caribbean saw a 19% increase in bookings from New York from passengers who had never previously cruised.

Action: Passers-by of these live billboards had a hard time looking away. The real-time feed showed beautiful blue water, fun in the sun, and it was easy to relate to the selected “influencers” who were broadcasting from the cruise.

Value Proposition: The value to the consumer was a real-life glimpse into what a Royal Caribbean cruise was like. Many people view cruises in a certain stereotypical light, but the live feed to the New York billboards showed a younger, more fun and adventurous side of cruising.

 

“Cardinals have flown away.”

Cardinals.PNG

Cardinals 1

Cardinals 2

cardinals 3

Link to Ad: https://www.effie.org/case_database/case/NA_2007_33

  • Firm: Schupp Company, Inc. *Lead Agency
  • Company: KTRS
  • Title: Missing Birds
  • Publish/Event Date: 2007
  • Awards: Effie- 2007 SILVER MEDIA IDEA

Objective: Creatively get the point across that the broadcast of the Cardinals baseball games would be moving to a different station after 52 years at a different station.

Target Market: Adult men (and some women) in St. Louis who typically listen to baseball games while driving in their cars.

Action: The Cardinals on the billboards physically “flew” to a different sign to signify that they had moved to a 550 KTRS radio station. This creatively informed the consumer to tune into a new station.

Value Proposition: The value to the consumer is they were informed of the change in the station in a clever and fun way.

 

**Cover Photo Credit: http://www.vintageadoftheweek.com/1971-mercury-cougar-xr-7-billboard/ follow them for a vintage ad of the week**

5 Magazine Ad Campaigns

This week I’m analyzing Magazine Ads, and wow, there were so many good ones to choose from! I decided to go international for you. Most of the ads I’m exposed to are from my home country of the US, so I really enjoyed spending some time on the adsofthewold.com site. Here is a selection of ads that really get their point across:

“Yes we can.”

Obama-yes we can

Link to Ad: http://www.adsoftheworld.com/collection/obama_in_advertising#showdelta=16

  • Firm: Ogilvy, South Africa
  • Company: Volkswagen
  • Title: Obama
  • Published: November 2010

Objective: The very simple ad states, “yes we can- 2008” at the top and “Small can be powerful. 118kW 1.4l TSI. Das Auto. Volkswagen” at the bottom. They are comparing the small but powerful Obama campaign slogan to the small but powerful VW car.

Target Market: South Africans who had followed the US presidential election of Barak Obama.

Action: Inspire trust. Invoke a sense of power and simplicity through comparing the short campaign slogan to the design of the VW.

Value Proposition: If a short but powerful slogan can win an election, just imagine the power of this small car.

 

“Come back another day.”

polar bear

Link to Ad: https://aef.com/ad-campaigns/polar-bear-3/

  • Firm: Scholz Friends Berlin GmbH, Berlin
  • Company: Zoo Berlin Zoo Card
  • Title: Polar Bear
  • Publish Date: 2007
  • Awards: Clio award 2007

Objective: Expand sales of season passes to the zoo by showing reasons a consumer might want a season’s pass zoo card.

Target Market: Adults, children, adults who have to comfort little children who have been disappointed in not seeing their favorite animal at the zoo.

Action: Buy a zoo card. It’s worth the cost when you can’t see everything in one day. Upgrade to a season pass and come any time you would like.

Value Proposition: If the polar bear or whatever favorite animal you came to see won’t come out on the day you go to the zoo, there is a good reason to get a zoo card. The consumer can always come back another day.

 

“Wild Night”

Valentine Bed

Link to Ad: https://www.adsoftheworld.com/collection/highlighted_valentines_day_ads#showdelta=31

  • Firm: Cheetham
  • Bell, Manchester, UKCompany: Dreams
  • Title: Bed
  • Publish Date: February 2015

Objective: Highlight one of the many reasons that someone might need to buy a new bed. Use humor and the thought of a recent Valentine tryst to convince the viewer that they too, might need a new bed.

Target Market: This ad particularly targeted couples, the day after Valentine’s day in 2015 to persuade them with humor that they need a new bed.

Action: Come buy a bed at Dream. They understand your predicament.

Value Proposition: It’s ok if your Valentine’s Day gets a little wild because Dream is having a sale the very next day!

 

“Just Fly There”

just fly there

Link to Ad: https://www.adsoftheworld.com/media/print/eurowings_just_fly_there_1

  • Firm: Lukas Lindemann Rosinski, Hamburg, Germany
  • Company: Eurowings
  • Title: Just Fly There
  • Air Date: October 2017

Objective: This is one of a series of four ads depicting someone on the beautiful blue water enjoying the scenery. The objective is to entice the viewer to want to “just fly there.”

Target Market: Young, working adults, with some vacation time and some disposable income.

Action: Use some of your time off and just go somewhere cool, wonderful, relaxing.

Value Proposition: Travel can be as easy as a little money and a plane ticket. The value is in the reminder to take time away and go to places the viewer has always dreamt of.

 

“Smart Kitchen & Bathroom”

smart kitchen

smart bathroom

Link to Ad: https://www.adsoftheworld.com/media/print/eon_eon_climasmart_kitchen

  • Firm: M&C Saatchi, Milan, Italy
  • Company: E.ON
  • Title: E.ON ClimaSmart – Kitchen & E.ON ClimaSmart – Bathroom
  • Publish Date: October 2017

Objective: These two ads show the problem of wasting energy in homes. ClimaSmart technology is their solution. They use: #wehatewaste

Target Market: Adult homeowners with some climate control problems within their homes.

Action: Look further than your car or recycling for your environmental impact. Energy in homes is a great place to start. Their tagline is, “A better climate starts from your home.”

Value Proposition: E.ON can help you reduce waste, better control the temp in your home, and help you have a better environmental impact.

 

**Cover Photo Credit: https://www.picxclicx.com/free-stock-photos-stack-of-magazines-12/ **

3 Reasons to Market at Trade Shows and Professional Association Conferences

I am behind my computer today trying to catch up after two weeks of attending conferences. The first of which was the Bersin Impact conference in Hollywood, FL and the second was the Society for Healthcare Volunteer Leaders (SHVL) conference in Lexington, KY. I attended these very different conferences to stay up to date on the latest trends for departments that I lead: Human Resources (HR) and Volunteers.

While both of these conferences were very different, they had one very significant thing in common that relates to strategic marketing for entrepreneurs. A formal vendor presence. Here are some reasons why you might consider marketing your product or service at a trade or professional show:

  1. Captive Target Audience– If you are selling a cutting-edge HR software, who better to talk to than HR professionals attending a conference on the most up-to-date social capital trends? Once they find out the trends, they’ll want a way to implement it in their own organizations. Sell them the tools while they are there.
  2. Sales Leads– People like games and free stuff. You can cold call people all day and not get a lead, or you can purchase some fun swag and create a contest at your trade show booth. You wouldn’t believe what contact information people are willing to share for a free hoodie. Once you wrap up from the conference, you have an entire list of people to follow-up with. All of whom you have already established a positive, reward, relationship with.
  3. Scope Out the Competition– We don’t always know our top competitors until they set-up booth 10 feet from us. In this day and age companies are created quickly to fill needs in the business world. Sometimes companies make their debut or release upgrades at conferences. As a fellow vendor, you have full access to the vendor show floor. You can collect brochures and make contacts with other players in your area of expertise.

There are professional associations for just about everything these days. Don’t count yourself out of attendance just because no one else you know is going. A quick internet search can yield many results for your niche market. And don’t worry if the association you are interested in doesn’t allow for vendor booths at conferences. Join anyway. By joining associations, you can often sponsor speaking sessions or at minimum have access to basic contact info for fellow members.

Your Brand= Your People

I’ve been at the Bersin Impact 2018 conference this week. In fact, I’m typing this from my hotel room in Hollywood, FL. I’ve been surrounded by amazing business leaders and HR professionals from around the globe talking about human capital trends. This isn’t the kind of stuff you might remember from your mother’s glory days in “personnel”. The lines of where HR starts and the business starts are continually blurred (as they should be). HR is not external to the business; people ARE business.

Deloitte Human Capital Trends 2018

Deloitte has identified the overarching human capital trend for 2018 as “the rise of the social enterprise”. Gone are the days where CEOs of your favorite brands can remain silent on social issues that affect both their customers and employees. A major player and role model in this trend is Unilever. You may or may not recognize the company name, but you will certainly recognize their brands like: Magnum, Helmans, Dove, Lipton, Ben&Jerry’s, Nexxus, Ponds, and V05 just to name a few.

Leena Nair

This morning’s key note speaker and Unilever’s CHRO extraordinaire was Leena Nair. Her message was very clear about a company’s responsibility to be a change agent for good in both the lives of their employees and their consumers. Here are some of the key take-away points from her presentation that relate to both people and brand:

  • Create a culture where your employees feel like they can be their authentic selves at work and they will be your best brand ambassadors. You can see examples of this in Unilever’s sponsorship of Pride, diversity/inclusion in Dove commercial, etc.
  • One of Leena’s first slides articulated: “Brands with purpose grow faster, companies with purpose last, and people with purpose thrive”.
  • Leaders have responsibilities to further brand and purpose internally and externally.

Unilever leadership

  • Millions of people apply to Unilever and even if they aren’t hired, the company has a duty to respect each as a human and consumer by giving them feedback/response to their application. Maintaining a positive experience with Unilever.

I immediately started following Leena and other Unilever leaders on social media. I can’t wait to learn more about what Unilever does next as a socially responsible enterprise. And because I love supporting good companies, I’ll keep buying my Nexxus shampoo and eating plenty of Ben&Jerry’s. Marketing at its finest!

*All photos were taken by me and are either from Leena Nair’s presentation at the conference or the Deloitte/Bersin sessions.

 

 

5 Award Winning TV Ad Campaigns

This post is the second installment of our greatest marketing campaigns assignment. This week the media type is television and I’ve curated some of the most sappy, touching, and impactful recent ads that I could find. I’ve had an emotional week, for many reasons, and couldn’t help but be drawn to this gut-wrenching genre. I hope you enjoy these as much as I enjoyed analyzing them. Word of caution: grab a box of tissues.

 

“How else could I bring you all together?”

how else could I bring you together

Objective: EDEKA is one of the larger super market corporations in Germany. When people come together during the holidays, they need to cook meals and shop in the grocery store. This ad reminds people of the relationships that really matter and a lovely side effect of having family parties is the need to go food shopping.

Target Market: Anyone who feels guilty for not visiting their family enough. And anyone who might be feeling lonely around the holidays.

Action: Don’t wait for a funeral announcement to bring your family together. Celebrate and love one another, now.

Value Proposition: Come together as a family over the holidays and you will share much more than a meal.

 

“It can wait”

it can wait

Objective: This ad shows the complex yet mundane worlds of the many characters within a neighborhood. The uneventfulness of the majority of the film builds suspense for “something” to happen. That something is a crash when a mom glances at her phone and enters the oncoming lane, smashing into a truck.

Target Market: This ad speaks to everyone. It shows how a simple action can cause tremendous trauma to the entire neighborhood.

Action: AT&T wants to remind customers to not post, glance, email, search, or text while driving.

Value Proposition: If you refrain from using your phone for complex tasks in the car you can keep your eyes and your full attention on actually driving. You will prevent accidents, injury, and maybe even death.

 

“Astronauts Welcome”

astronauts welcome

Objective: This beautiful ad humanizes the refugee crisis. While many countries won’t allow for refugees, this ad shows the imaginative young mind of a girl journeying to a new life, with a father who indulges her imagination to make the journey less scary.

Target Market: This ad aims to win the hearts and minds of people who may not see refugees as “worthy” or as people (the same as they are).

Action: This story told by a little refugee girl persuades the audience to look at her as any other child in their own lives.

Value Proposition: If you open your heart to the journey, the story, and the humanity of refugees, you might find yourself making different decisions about welcoming them to your country, town, or community.

 

“Hello Beautiful”

hello beautiful

Objective: We watch as two women go through their daily lives while learning sign language. By the end of the commercial, we learn that the two women are married and are adopting a child who is deaf. Wells Fargo has helped them prepare their finances for the day that “two becomes three”.

Target Market: Anyone who has attempted to get their finances in order as their family grew and changed.

Action: It’s not just about preparing mentally, learning a new language, or prepping your home. Consult with Wells Fargo on the big changes in your life.

Value Proposition: Wells Fargo will help you plan your financial future. They can help you through the big changes in life, like adopting a child.

 

“Roles Change. Without us noticing.”

roles change

Objective: Inform the viewer that there are resources for those who find themselves in a role reversal with taking care of their aging parents. The ad uses a sense of nostalgia to compel us to look into how AARP can help.

Target Market: This ad targets the sandwich generation. Anyone who may be caring for an aging parent and still be raising a young family of their own would be interested by this tactic.

Action: Let AARP help you find the resources you need to care for those that you love, in your new-found role as caregiver.

Value Proposition: There is help and support for those who may not have ever seen themselves as a caregiver or for someone struggling with their new “role”.

 

*All photos are still shots of the television ads referenced in this post.

 

When the CEO Gives You a Life Size Santa, You Say, Thank You

ENT 630 Wk 8-Reactions to It’s a Jungle in There

This week as I close the final chapter of Steven Schussler’s It’s a Jungle in There, I am reminded of the daily work of my teams. In my health system, I have the privilege of leading three great teams. Two of whom are directly related to this week’s reading: Volunteer Engagement Team and our Rathbun Hospitality House. In Schussler’s final two chapters he speaks about social responsibility and philanthropy, a primary part of my weekly work life.

This week the HR team that I lead hosted about 90 team members from across our health system for a “great place to work and practice” retreat. The retreat was amazing, but that’s not the story I’m telling today. About thirty minutes before the retreat I received a text from the Senior Vice President to whom I report (my boss’s boss) saying that our CEO, who happened to be our first guest speaker of the day, was bringing a “Giant Santa” to give to my team at the Rathbun House. After the CEO spoke and interacted with team members at the retreat, one of my team members walked with him to his car and transferred the nearly 5-foot elvish beast into my VW wagon. Our CEO, sent this lovely creature to our Rathbun House because he knew it would bring great joy to those who enter Rathbun during the holiday season.

You see, Rathbun is a refuge in the woods, just a little over a mile from the hospital where families in medical crisis, who travel from outside our home county, can stay up to 21 days free of charge (with the proper care management referral). Our Hospitality house is funded through philanthropic dollars and primarily staffed with volunteers.

The Santa was sent to bring a smile to the faces of those who come through the doors. To our guests who are often fatigued, fragile, or frightened. A volunteer who had been decorating the window boxes and hanging wreathes walked in and said, “wow, we are big-time now, that looks like something that would be in a resort.” By the time I left for the day, volunteers, staff, and guests were having their pictures made with the happy new Santa. And the most impressive thing to everyone was that the CEO of our 12,000-employee company had remembered our department when acquiring such a cheerful gift.

I am privileged that my daily work can very quickly be linked to a more significant purpose: The health, healing, and care of those that we serve. For companies or individuals who can’t make such an immediate connection, volunteerism and philanthropy are fantastic ways to stay connected to a larger purpose and to develop corporate communities (see #14 of the linked article). Additionally, Coppy Holzman, a writer for Forbes and Entrepreneur says there are four big ways your company can benefit from giving back:

  1. Builds respect & reputation in the community
  2. Makes the community a better place
  3. Employees respect leaders who give-back
  4. Make connections; build network

And when you, your team, or your company decide to give-back through your time or dollars, look no further than your own community.

 

 “No one is useless in the world who lightens the burden of another.”

-Charles Dickens (p.197)

Helping Others Succeed Through Their Strengths

ENT 630 Wk 7-Reactions to It’s a Jungle in There

The self-examination question for chapter 22 of It’s a Jungle in There, asks, “Are you willing to help other people succeed even when it’s not a requirement of your job to be of assistance?” (p.165)

For many years and multiple organizations, I’ve been known as the “Interview Prepper.” Whenever someone I know is interviewing for a promotion, they schedule time with me for mock interviews and prep. I help people talk about themselves, their skills, their talents, and their drive for success. I offer constructive criticism and remind my colleagues of good examples to use from their professional projects. I delight in the success of my friends and colleagues. I also help them to pick up the pieces and try again if at first, they don’t succeed. Everything is a learning opportunity.

I can say, without a doubt, chapter 12 resonates most with the way I choose to operate as a leader. Developing and coaching others is a passion for me. I also found out a few years ago that these behaviors are classic signs of one of my top two strength roles. By using the StandOut strengths assessment I discovered, I am a pioneer/teacher. The going rate is about 15 dollars for the assessment alone, or there are companion books like StandOut 2.0 that you can buy on Amazon in e-book format for less than $15 (then, just use the code that comes with the book). This assessment is a situation judgment assessment, which means it helps define through behavioral questions how you show up to others, not necessarily how you perceive yourself. I have a 12-page report ranking my strengths, telling me about my most powerful attributes, what to watch out for, how to hone my strengths, etc.

The combined role summary for a pioneer//teacher describes me perfectly: “You take risks. With people. Not in a reckless, thoughtless way, but rather from a profound belief in their potential. And, in your view, that potential can be best realized through experiment and risk. You say “experience is the best teacher” and so you expose and encourage people to embrace stretch assignments. You put your own skin in the game too, recognizing that your own abilities are amplified when you seek opportunities to reach beyond your current comfort zone. Your world is a generous place in which people will be provided for. You, therefore, come from a place of faith, not fear. If there’s anything to fear, it’s missing opportunity’s knock.” (StandOut 2015)

The combination of my top two strengths roles is my competitive advantage. Strengths are also the completive advantage of those around us. As the owner of the company or the leader of the team, it’s our responsibility to give people the opportunity to live in those strengths.

I felt pretty powerful and validated to read that strengths summary. I do have a profound belief in the potential of others. To Schussler’s point in chapter 22, it’s important to find out about people, figure out what makes them tick, what makes them feel energized or drained and then match them with opportunities to help them be their best selves.

When you help others succeed, the whole team is better for it. The Marcus Buckingham Company (TMBC) has some compelling evidence to back-up the claim that teams who concentrate on strengths outperform non-strengths-based peers. And as for me, I’ll keep helping those around me work from their strengths, because I’ve seen how much happier and more productive we all can be when a leader cares enough about you to know what makes you tick.